Common Rosacea Triggers

Rosacea has two common types; acne rosacea in the face and ocular rosacea that settles in the eyes. The symptoms of acne rosacea is red and flushed skin, dry flaky skin, increase in body temperature and facial flushing with food or event triggers, and breakouts or pustules that centralize generally on the nose, forehead, and cheeks. The symptoms of ocular rosacea is dry irritated eyes, burning in the eyes, blepharitis (irritated eyelids), red eyes and eyelids, styes or chalazions, and the sensation that there is something in the eye even when no foreign body is found.

Treatments for rosacea generally include either topical antibiotics or oral antibiotics, light therapies, and sometimes even microdermabrasion can help. Antibiotics seem to be the best method to see a difference in the facial flushing and in the pustule production.

Antibiotics used in rosacea have been known to reduce the symptoms of rosacea, including redness, pimples, and red lines on the face (telangiectasia), and thick bumps on the nose (rhinophyma), and to reduce the symptoms that accompany eye involvement in rosacea.

With oral antibiotic treatment, symptoms usually improve in 3 to 4 weeks, with greater improvement seen in 2 months. A dual combo of oral and topical antibiotics will see faster results. There is a chance that the bacteria in a rosacea sufferer will develop new immunities to the antibiotic and become less effective. To combat this you can use antibiotics for a shorter period of time. If one antibiotic stops working, a new one can be prescribed.

Topical antibiotics for rosacea are used either alone, or with an oral antibiotic to aid in the treatment of rosacea. Topical antibiotics are used to kill the bacteria that are on the skin. and can be used to reduce the symptoms of rosacea, including redness, pimples, and red lines on the face (telangiectasia), and thick bumps on the nose (rhinophyma), and to reduce the symptoms that accompany eye involvement in rosacea.

One widely popular, and very effective, form of topical antibiotic treatment for rosacea is the medication metronidazole. Studies have found that if red, raised bumps have developed, topical metronidazole (1%) is safe and effective. Metronidazole gel (.75%) is effective in preventing or minimizing recurrences of rosacea.

With antibiotic treatment, symptoms usually improve in 3 to 4 weeks, with greater improvement seen in 2 months. A dual combo of oral and topical antibiotics will see faster results. There is a chance that the bacteria in a rosacea sufferer will develop new immunities to the antibiotic and become less effective. To combat this you can use antibiotics for a shorter period of time. If one antibiotic stops working, a new one can be prescribed.

Most Common Rosacea Triggers

With a survey of 1,066 rosacea patients, these were listed as the most common factors that are potential triggers.

Sun Exposure 81%
Emotional Stress 79%
Hot Weather 75%
Wind 57%
Heavy Exercise 56%
Alcohol Consumption 53%
Hot Baths 51%
Cold Weather 46%
Spicy Foods 45%
Humidity 44%
Indoor Heat 41%
Certain Skincare Products 41%
Heated Beverages 36%
Certain Cosmetics 27%
Medications 15%
Medical Conditions 15%
Certain Fruits 13%
Marinated Meats 10%
Certain Vegetables 9%
Dairy Products 8%

Physical Discomfort of Rosacea

With a survey of 605 rosacea patients, the National Rosacea Society saw that 93% of sufferers had physical discomfort with their rosacea. These were there complaints:

Burning 72%
Itching 61%
Stinging 52%
Swelling 41%
Tenderness 40%
Skin Tightness 36%
Tingling 31%
Prickly Sensation 24%

Where Physical Discomfort is Centralized

In the same 605 patient survey, the people suffering from physical discomfort listed where the discomfort was localized as the following:

Cheeks 80%
Nose 53%
Eyes 48%
Chin 40%
Forehead 36%
Scalp 20%
Ears 18%
Neck 16%
Behind Ears 11%

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