Review: Norah Jones’ Come Away with Me

Taking a Trip

As you place this CD in your stereo. You sit and listen and feel as though you are suddenly taking a trip to the past. In the blink of an eye, you now find yourself in an old cabaret-style restaurant, dim lights and all.

Sitting with a drink in one hand and cigar in the other. Smoke impairing your vision as you gaze on. A silky vision of a young woman before you appears. In a delicate and sweet melody she is voicing a story about a cold cold heart. In a fantasy-like setting you find this singer lying across a big black piano bed. With great passion she sings to you about love that has been found, love that has flown away and indeed, also about a nightingale.

All this, while a tall fellow plays the piano, making it look as though he were reuniting with an old lover. You look to your right, and you find yourself looking at a big sign that says: “Blue Note” The best jazz in town. At this point you just sit back relax and worry not about if its jazz, pop, or anything else.. all you know is that you are relaxing to a wonderful voice and an even greater gifted presence.

Reality

So okay you do not literally travel to the past. However, you have been introduced to a very pleasant future. A future in which talent is rewarded. Come Away With Me by Norah Jones is were great vocals and true writing sense unite. A CD where true effort is shown. In a mainstream pop culture like we have today, it is greatly a fine experience to hear an album that is more about soul and less about teen angst.

When I Met Norah

My first introduction to Norah Jones was a music video on MTV. This was the video for “Dont Know Why.” It blew me away. The song had the kind of passion that is too much to grasp on the first listen. On the second listen I was still astonished by the lyrical presence that the song held. Two weeks later, I still, would stop it all… just to listen and watch this video. In a whole, it captivated my entire attention.

Then What?

I wanted more. I knew that from this song came great talent. There fore I must have more. What I did then was go out and search for the album. Since, back then, Norah Jones was not as popular as she became, I could not find her in stock in most places I went. (Most places around my area only carry rap, r&b, and pop) So I gave up, but the day I did… I received a package in the mail. What did it have? A gift from my future wife.. the CD.

So I immediately locked myself in the room and started listening. That was my introduction to the calmest most mellow captivating music that I have ever laid my ear canals upon. I knew that jazz it was not but how could you possibly call that pop, what I called it was just plain old good.

Do Know… What?

“Dont Know Why” is the first gem that we encounter. This song holds poetic lyrics that prod at a once taboo subject that is always in the mind but not quite always in the mouth. (Although now a days it is, the subject is touched by all and at any time) As we get to “Cold Cold Heart” we found a song that is quick paced and heart felt all at the same time.

Yet, we still have not gotten to time stopping music till we hit “Come Away With Me” this song captivates you. It swallows you up and fills you with emotion. If ever there is a chance to feel a joyful sad emotion, it is truly experienced when listening to this song.

Many songs in this album are certainly worthy of being acknowledged. I must however raise one song above all … “Nightingale” Oh my… This song surely raptures me every time I listen to it. It is as if she has transformed her heart felt emotion into musical melody. Sensitivity at its best. A song of comfort. Adding to a collection of pleasantly written songs. Indeed, this is an album of poetic collection.

Norah Jones’ Come Away With Me is mellow expression at its grandest. Self-expression without conforming and true musical grit. Who said you need to be loud to rock out. Surely, Mrs. Jones has rocked out and then some.

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