How to Celebrate Purim at Home

Purim is no doubt the most rollicking holiday of the Jewish calendar and it marks the day when Queen Esther, along with Mordecai, failed Haman plans of killing each and every Jew in the kingdom. This day usually falls on 14th of the Hebrew month of Adar. So, if you are planning to host Purim celebrations right at your home and you are confused on what to do, then keep reading this article to learn some basic things you can do.

Instructions

  • 1

    First of all, you have to pick a date for Purim celebrations. For that purpose, you can choose the exact date, or a date close the real date (in case you want to celebrate on Sunday). To check for the actual date, you can have a look at the Jewish calendar or you can check it online.

  • 2

    Send invitations to children to come and celebrate Purim at your home. You can ask your children to provide you with the list of their friends and also call children from your neighbourhood. If the children are not aware of this holiday, then you should first give them a brief introduction about it by telling them how the whole incident happened and its addition in the holy Bible.

  • 3

    You can ask the children to dress up like Queen Esther, Mordecai, Haman or any character they like.

  • 4

    Consider arranging different age appropriate games for the children who will be visiting your home to be a part of the Purim celebrations. Do not only stage the games, but also, you should reward the children with some inexpensive gifts for participating in them.

  • 5

    Do not forget to serve hamantashen cookies, as they are traditional items for Purim celebrations. The shape of the hamantashen cookies is usually 3-cornered hat, which Haman used to wear.

  • 6

    You can also arrange an activity in which you provide the children with the ingredients for making hamantashen cookies and ask them to make their own. While they make their cookies, help them.

  • 7

    Do not forget to read the book of Esther, also known as the Megillah. While reading the book, shake groggers and make noise whenever Haman’s name comes in the text. You can also ask the children to boo when his name comes.

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